Book Notes | Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul (Chapter 5)

Read my notes on Chapter Four: A Letter From Christ here. Paul’s Readings of Scripture Hays boldly says that “for Paul, original intention is not a primary hermeneutical concern. […] Eschatological meaning subsumes original sense” (p.156). Paul “reads Scripture primarily as a narrative of divine election and promise […] the Torah is neither superseded nor nullified but transformed into a witness of the gospel” (p.157). One problem with this is that hermeneutical freedom becomes a license to misinterpret....

September 4, 2021 · 2 min · Benedict

Book Notes | Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul (Chapter 4)

Read my notes on Chapter Three: Intertextual Echo in Romans here. 2 Cor. 3:1-4:6 - A Reading Hays identifies echoes of the letter-spirit dichotomy in Jer. 38:33 and Ezek. 36:26 which combines the picture of God writing on the heart with fleshly hearts replacing stony ones (p.129). For Hays, the letter-spirit opposition is between “inscription” and “enfleshment.” The point is that Paul’s ministry “centres not on texts but on the Spirit-empowered transformation of human community” (p....

September 3, 2021 · 2 min · Benedict

Book Notes | Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul (Chapter 3)

Read my notes on Chapter Two: Intertextual Echo in Romans here. Ecclesiocentric Hermeneutics Hays is adamant that rather than a christocentric interpretation of the OT, Paul primarily sees the church as “the goal of God’s redemptive action” (p.84). “What Paul finds in Scripture, above all else, is a prefiguration of the church as the people of God” (p.85). In line with this, there are two important questions to consider:...

August 31, 2021 · 3 min · Benedict

Book Notes | Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul (Chapter 2)

Read my notes on Chapter One: The Puzzle of Pauline Hermeneutics here. In this chapter, Hays focuses on two aspects of God’s righteousness: His covenant faithfulness (Rom. 1:16-17) Judgement on the wicked (Rom. 1:18-3:20) This is important because Hays identifies one of Paul’s main focus in Romans as addressing “the problem of God’s saving righteousness in relation to Israel.” (p.34) The first passage Hays examines in depth is Rom....

August 29, 2021 · 5 min · Benedict

Book Review | Preaching and Teaching From the Old Testament | Walter Kaiser Jr.

I bought this on Kindle many years back and finally got to reading it in preparation for a workshop with my GG on reading the Old Testament. I’ve told myself that I should be less critical, so I’d give this book 3.5 out of 5. It is excellent as an introduction, but I wouldn’t recommend it for those already familiar with the subject, or for those looking for specific principles or methods....

August 22, 2021 · 2 min · Benedict

Book Notes | Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul (Chapter 1)

I recently began reading Richard B. Hays' Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul. In another effort to consolidate my understanding, I’m planning to write my summaries and thoughts on each chapter. This is on Chapter One: The Puzzle of Pauline Hermeneutics. Hays traces two main critical approaches to Pauline hermeneutics. The first approach is to be dismissive of Paul’s hermeneutics, “because [this approach] see[s] his reading of Scripture as periphetal to the core of his religious experience....

August 15, 2021 · 4 min · Benedict

Book Review | A New Testament Biblical Theology | G. K. Beale

Introduction Most evangelical biblical theologies rightly focus on narrative. In my circle, the most popular approach is Graeme Goldsworthy’s focus on the Kingdom of God, which gained a wide audience thanks to Vaughan Roberts' God’s Big Picture. Others have cropped up, including James Hamilton’s God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology, Tom Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty: A Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments. The topic has fascinated me, and a few weeks ago, I finished G....

July 17, 2021 · 4 min · Benedict

Eerdmans Spring Summer 2021 Academic Catalogue

This post was originally written and published on 28 April 2021. William B. Eerdmans Publishing, a respected Christian publisher, recently released their Spring/Summer 2021 academic catalogue. The highlight is probably the launch of a new commentary Commentaries for Christian Formation (CCF) series, with N. T. Wright’s Galatians being the inaugural volume. Apparently, this is the first major biblical commentary that Wright has written, and on Galatians too! We shouldn’t be surprised if there are swift responses (detractors?...

May 8, 2021 · 2 min · Benedict